Favorite Pattern Motif so Far? Stars.

On our Scandinavian Weavers group warp, three people have chosen to weave stars.  Recently, Lisa Torvik’s star peeps out as Sara Okern weaves a blue star.

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Lisa Torvik’s bright and festive star pattern

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Sara Okern said this was the first time she has woven anything but a rag rug.  Success! 

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Sara wove a blue star.

Norwegian Yarn in the Swedish Dukagång

Karin Maahs finished her piece, and her pattern weft was sentimental. She used thin Norwegian yarn her grandmother used to embroider bunads (Norwegian costumes).

One day her pattern was sitting on the loom. “Oh nice, that’s what was just finished,” I thought as I snapped this photo.  Clearly I had not looked carefully, as that was the just completed piece, and Karin’s pattern ready to start.  Weaving from the back makes this process hard to document!

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Here’s Karin’s piece, underway.  It will be nice to photograph all the pieces once they are off the loom.  For now, it still looks great at this weird angle.

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A Dukagång among Friends

Patty Johnson, Jane Connett and Judy Larson whipped out their dukagång in record time.

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Judy and Jane figure out the pattern.

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Patty helping out under the loom

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Their pattern revealed from below

Skinny Woman, Fatter Man?

Mary Skoy is working on her dukagang piece this weekend, weaving a dancing couple from a piece at the American Swedish Institute.

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She was using four shots of pattern yarn to make a square, with only one shot of background weft between each pattern shot.  This resulted in a skinny woman! For the man, she is switching to five pattern shots per square; it will be interesting to see how that changes the pattern.

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She’s using a variety of wools from her stash for the pattern; sometimes two strands of Harrisville Highland (blue) or a single strand of a fatter knitting yarn (red and white).

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Mary placed a white piece of fabric on the piece below the loom, when she discovered that the lint from the linen was falling on the piece below.

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Mary’s weaving experience was great, although once she congratulated herself for weaving with no broken threads– snap went a selvedge thread.

Dukagång Group Project Underway

By Robbie LaFleur

Last year and this year our Scandinavian Weavers study Group is focusing on Swedish weaving, with a particular interest in linen.  We’ve begun a group project on one of the two Glimakra looms at the Weavers Guild of Minnesota.  We put on a 12″ wide warp of 20/2 half-bleached linen, set at 24 epi, to experiment with dukagång. Jan Mostrom deserves special thanks for ordering the yarn and winding the warp.

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Jan and Phyllis Waggoner warped; Melba Granlund helped, too.

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Their efforts resulted in a even-tensioned warp with a beautifully wide shed. Each of 12 weavers will weave 12-18″. I was the first to test the warp, and I chose an image I frequently weave — can you tell from the back? Dukagång is woven from the back.

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Jan Mostrom was the second one to weave, and the right side of my piece peeked at her as it wound through the loom. Now you’ll get it.

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Jan Mostrom was next on the loom; look at her beautiful stars–or as much as you can see, at this point. Melba Granlund was the third person to weave; you can see the back of her piece here.  A little hard to decipher…

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Here’s Melba’s pattern: birds, a fabulous griffin, and a stylized floral border.

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A problem with weaving grid-based patterns is remembering where you left off.  I solved it by highlighting each new row before I wove it.

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Melba’s system was more ingenious.  She asked her husband, “Don’t you have a magnetized clipboard?”  Shortly after, he came from the basement with a tool, a discarded metal refrigerator rack with a strong magnet. Melba moved the pattern as she finished each row.

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I’ll share more photos as this magical warp progresses, and the cut-off day will be super fun.

 

 

 

Show and Tell

At the Scandinavian Weavers meeting yesterday we enjoyed Judy Larson’s latest red rugs. Judy often weaves LARGE rugs, but these were small ones, using wildly different wefts, on the same warp.  She wove one with chunky weft of knit ties, part of an 8000-tie stash from a man who worked at the Library of Congress, and never wore the same tie twice. The second one has sharp pink with red, and is made with silky-soft velour strips—her granddaughter’s favorite.  The third uses the most conventional rag rug weft, printed cottons.  Fun!

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Threads of Devotion: Possible Medieval Origins of Nordic Christening Bands

 

cradle-wholeScandinavian Weavers Group member Lisa Bauch is a fan of traditional red-and-white woven bands.  Recently, feeling inspired by a beautiful display of bands on a cradle at the American Swedish Institute, she delved further into the topic for a paper in an art history course, “Medieval Sacred Space.” Read more about it, and link to the full paper, in the most recent issue of the Norwegian Textile Letter.

Read Lisa’s article and paper here.
See more photos and read about the inspirational baby basket with bands here.

In this issue, you will also find a reprint of a spectacular article on medieval Norwegian billedvev, and an article on the marvelous contemporary tapestry weaver Brita Been.  And monster weaving photos.  Check it out.